Archive for May, 2012

In the current political climate with Monarchs abandoning luncheon, frontier queues exceeding 3 hours due to fishing related debates, and with Calentita (Gibraltar’s Food Festival) fast approaching, I thought it was only appropriate that I embraced Gibraltarianism and confirmed my patriotism – even if only in the kitchen!

So what makes a recipe quintessentially Gibraltarian?

Gibraltarian cuisine is the result of 300 years of British rule combined with the coming together of immigrants from a variety of Mediterranean countries. It is a combination of British (from the different regiments stationed on the Rock) Maltese, Genoese, Italian, Menorcan, Moroccan and Spanish cuisines.

This marriage of tastes has resulted in a peculiar cuisine where some dishes are made as in the country of origin, whereas others have been adapted for various reasons such as: lack of produce (due to the many sieges Gibraltar has endured) and family adaptations. As few people could read and write these recipes were passed down, from generation to generation, by word of mouth. These ‘mistakes’ became family traditions. And to this day, these recipes are still passed by word of mouth with each individual or family personalising each dish.

“I remember whilst at university, phoning my Gran and asking her how to make her rice pudding. After all with “un puñado” ( a handful) of this and all measured “a calculo” (by eye) I didn’t have a recipe to follow. I was on the phone to her for approx an hour whilst I stirred the rice pudding mixture on the hob; describing it’s texture to her, until she was confident that I had made it as she would have.”

There are not many purely Gibraltarian dishes, but those that do exist are cooked frequently and abundantly. Dishes such as Rosto, Calentita, Minestra, Torta de Acelgas, Fideos al horno, Rolitos and desserts such as Pan Dulce, Rosquitos, Bollos de Hornazo, hojuelas and pudín de pan.

Wanting to capture the essence of the Gibraltarian kitchen, I have decided to try and recreate some of these recipes. Please note that the following versions are my family’s recipes

“passed from generation to generation, by word of mouth”

Alternative versions are not wrong.  Fundamentally, they embrace Gibraltarianism!

Rosto

1st: Chop a medium onion and add to a saucepan with olive oil.  Sweat the onions down.  Crush in some garlic.

2nd: Peel and chop some carrots and add them to the saucepan.

3rd: Cut pork loin slices into strips and add to the saucepan.

4th: Once the pork is cooked add a can of tomato purée.  Rinse the can with water and add this to the saucepan.

5th: Season with salt and pepper and add a pinch of sugar to the saucepan.  Sprinkle with oregano.

6th: Whilst this is cooking in another saucepan boil your pasta (traditionally either macaroni or penne) until aldente.

7th: Once the carrots are soft, drain the pasta and mix everything together.

8th: Serve with grated cheese – traditionally this is “queso de bola” Edam (Dutch).

Enjoy! Que aproveche!

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When I was in Hong Kong back in 2005, one of my first meals was a Dim Sum lunch washed down with warm jasmine tea (check my “Oriental” post).

Eating dim sum is known in Cantonese as “yum cha” (drinking tea 美味) as jasmine tea is traditionally drunk with this snack.

Able (Rick’s fiancée) ordered dim sum for us. She chose those which were sure to cater to our Western palates.

7 years later and my chance to experience dim sum returned whilst on holiday in Malaysia. We went to Pappa Rich for “Malaysian Treats” and lo and behold there was dim sum on the menu!!

Back at home – holidays over – I rediscovered my Asian Kitchen.

How difficult could it really be to create dim sum? A pastry case filled with a small amount of filling; steamed.

Admittedly the only reason why I was able to create these at home was thanks to the Mecca for Asian ingredients that is Ramsons!! I hit the jackpot when I found packets of frozen wonton wrappers in their freezer section.

Pork and Prawn Dim Sum

1st: Add the minced pork, shelled and uncooked prawns, spring onions, garlic, ginger, flour and soy sauce into a food processor and blitz until you form a smooth paste.

2nd: Line up the wonton squares on your work surface and using a pastry brush (my fingers did the job fine!) moisten the edges.

3rd: Place a teaspoonful of the pork and prawn mixture onto the centre of the square. Do not try and overfill as this will cause your dim sum to spill over in cooking.

4th: Pick all four corners of the wonton square and gently squeeze out any air still in the dim sum. The shape you choose to create is totally up to you.  I read somewhere that in Asian culture each shape has a different meaning or is created for a particular filling or occasion. I however am neither Asian nor deft at creating pastry shapes, hence my army of pork-prawn hobo sacks!

5th: Place the dim sum into a bamboo steamer for a few minutes.  I however, did not have a bamboo steamer so therefore chose to cook my dim sum gyoza-style.  I placed the dim sum into a frying pan with a little oil and fried the gyoza until the base was browned.  Then poured a glass of water into the pan to create steam and covered the pan for 3 mins.

I served my dim sum with sesame prawn toast and washed it down with warm, fragrant jasmine tea.

Delicious 美味