Archive for December, 2013

As much fun as the run up to Christmas is – the actual event divides us.  The stress of buying presents that outdo the ones you gave last year or the traditional family arguments has everyone bee-lining for the drinks cabinet upon arrival!  And even though you don’t need a manual to overcome the holiday blues, here is my mantra to see you through the ‘Season of Goodwill’ without needing rehabilitation.

All you need to remember is that Christmas is all about tradition.  Food tradition.  

Presents may come and go but ultimately the reunion of family and friends around a table sharing the same food is what is important.  And what stays with you when you grow-up is the familiarisation and comfort that that food tradition brought.

Our family’s food tradition at Christmas, like many other families in Gibraltar (other than the quintessential prawns, cured meats and cheeses plentiful at every Christmas table) was that on 24th December we would have roast leg of pork followed by my Granny’s trifle and on 25th December we would have roast turkey followed by Christmas pudding and custard with Grandpa’s cinnamon-induced-coughing-fits!

Boxing Day is where many families differed.  In our house, so as not to waste the good meat from Christmas Day, we would have croquettas.

A croqueta is a small breadcrumbed fried food roll containing mashed potatoes and ground meat/shellfish/fish/vegetables and mixed with bechamel sauce.

Again – how your family made these is another tradition.  Making a bechamel sauce would make it richer in taste and definitely more decadent but in a bid to use up Christmas roast leftovers, we would use any remaining roast potatoes (usually having to quickly boil some more) and leftover turkey.  I always remember my Mum and Grandpa processing turkey and potato leftovers in one of those 70’s/80’s stand alone beige plastic electric food grinders.  Then shaping the croquetas into sausage shaped rolls and dregging them through breadcrumbs, egg and then breadcrumbs again before frying them in oil.

croquettes

Even now, celebrating Christmas in the Uk our family tradition is kept going.  Leftover turkey and roasties are destined to be Boxing Day croquetas.  More recently I’ve been partnering these with my homemade chilli jam but ketchup is just as great!  

By the looks of it, we’re not the only family to do this, as Antony Worrall Thompson has provided a turkey and ham croqueta recipe in the Daily Mail’s Boxing Day edition. 

So remember, keeping your food traditions is what it is all about.

I hope you all had a Merry Christmas and wish you the best for the New Year.

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So…food gifts…where do you stand on these?

Are you of the, “What a great idea! Such a personal gift made with love”, “Can’t wait to use those preserved lemons in my next tagine” or “Stingy f*****r!”

TV Chefs and food experts try to convince us that a food gift would be a great present to receive – but most individuals would conceive it to be a cheap gift.  Others sense it to be almost like a charity thing, “food gift at Xmas.”  I must agree with the sentiment heralded by chefs, however, must clarify what I mean and would accept by a food gift:

a personalised, bespoke, homemade, carefully packaged gift.

Perhaps not some BHS random jar of something!

Some people may see the idea of a food gift as thrifty and a cheap option – but it is not about the money spent – as buying the ingredients and glass jars/bottles can sometimes be quite costly – and expensive gifts can often be inappropriate or unwanted! For me it’s about sharing with the recipient my time, thoughtfulness and newfound expertise (and clearly none of my humility!)

…BUT…

I do feel that you must know those who you are giving these gifts to well.  As they are going to appreciate your gift and not see it as a cheats way out of Xmas shopping.

Some of my staple gifts are Chilli Jam (which gets pre-orders throughout the year!) and biscotti (often made with a limoncello combo).  This year florentines, peanut brittle and cookie mix in a jar were also part of the food gifts available.

And having given them out to my Christmas Party guests I can’t but hope that they’ve enjoyed every bite and those with children have appreciated the cookies in a jar – which are ridiculously easy to make following the on jar instructions:

Merry Christmas!!